KY SBIR/STTR MATCH AWARDEE: Janelle Molloy


WildDog Physics 

Describe your SBIR/STTR project and what your company does or will do? 

Our company is developing a novel technology that will allow radiation therapy treatments to be delivered more safely and economically.  Because of the nature of the efficiencies, our technology will allow advanced radiation treatment to be delivered in rural and underserved regions.  As such, patients who otherwise would not be able to receive these important treatments will be able to access them in their local community. 

What is innovative about your SBIR/STTR project? 

We are incorporating a patent protected technology that automates and consolidates processes.  It acquires data with a precision that is unmatched in current technologies. 

What was the greatest challenge you encountered in developing your innovation and/or launching your startup and how did you overcome it? 

It became impossible to retain my full time faculty position and launch the company at the same time.  Over the course of several years, we were able to acquire funding allowing me to work full time for the company. 

What are you most proud of about your company? 

My team and the culture we have established.  There is trust, camaraderie and open-mindedness.   

What piece of advice do you have for SBIR/STTR applicants – or – what have you learned that you wish you’d known when pursuing SBIR? 

Don’t get discouraged.  Funding rates are low, so it’s a matter of statistics, developing a good proposal, and being there when luck is on your side. 

What is the most important ingredient or ingredients for a thriving innovation ecosystem? 

The technological resources available from Kentucky’s college and university systems is critical.  That, paired with the great support networks in the region are critical. 

What makes Kentucky a great place to pursue SBIR? 

Since Kentucky isn’t as well-known as Silicon Valley or other similar places, I think we try harder.  The community is supportive and not burdened with the huge egos that often accompany more established regions.